Remembrance Day 2009

November 11th, 2009 Permalink

Remembrance Day is commemorated on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. Today, Canadian troops remain in harm’s way overseas in Afghanistan. An inevitable dwindling number of living veterans from previous wars has brought home to many Torontonians a renewed urgency in reflecting and connecting with veterans before they leave us. Collected here are images in and around Toronto of Remembrance Day, November 11, 2009. (23 photographs in all)

Woman reading names of fallen soldiers in the base wall of the Soldiers' Tower beside Hart House, Universirty of Toronto, St. George Campus. (HiMY SYeD)

A woman reads names of fallen students in the base wall of Soldiers' Tower beside Hart House, University of Toronto, St. George Campus. (HiMY SYeD)

Service of Remembrance at The Soldiers' Tower. The University of Toronto community gathers to remember the faculty, staff, alumni and students who fell in the First and Second World Wars and other action, takes place at the foot of Soldiers' Tower. The service includes the recitation of the poem In Flanders Fields, written by UC alumnus John McCrae, the singing of traditional hymns, readings, laying of wreaths, The Last Post, The Lament, Reveille, and the Royal and National Anthems. (HiMY SYeD)

2. Service of Remembrance at The Soldiers' Tower. The University of Toronto community gathers to remember the faculty, staff, alumni and students who fell in the First and Second World Wars and other action, takes place at the foot of Soldiers' Tower. The service includes the recitation of the poem In Flanders Fields, written by University College alumnus John McCrae, the singing of traditional hymns, readings, laying of wreaths, The Last Post, The Lament, Reveille, and the Royal and National Anthems. (HiMY SYeD)

3. A Royal Canadian Army Cadet Sergeant keeps vigil at the Cenotaph in East York's Civic Centre Memorial Gardens on Coxwell Avenue. This was one of five concurrent Remembrance Day ceremonies held at the City's civic centres. An earlier Remembrance Day ceremony took place on Sunday afternoon in Albert Campbell Square in front of the Scarborough Civic Centre. (Flickr/James Goneaux)

Toronto's largest red poppy in storefront shop window. Easily spotted by drivers and pedestrians alike in this stretch of Bloor Street West beside Christie Pits Park. Beside the Red Poppy is a photography of 19 year old William George Hill, Canadian Army Auxiliary Unit, World War II. The third generation of the Hill Family continues to operate this neighbourhood business today.  (HiMY SYeD)

4. Toronto's largest red poppy in storefront shop window. Easily spotted by drivers and pedestrians alike in this stretch of Bloor Street West beside Christie Pits Park. Alongside the giant red poppy is a framed black and white photograph of 19 year old William George Hill, Canadian Army Auxiliary Unit, World War II. Lisa Hill, William's daughter, is the third generation of the Hill Family who continues to operate this neighbourhood business. (HiMY SYeD)

Sounds of Canadian Army artillery fire and smoke fill Queen's Park Crescent as a lone bagpiper plays. A selection of martial music will follow performed by the five piece military band. (HiMY SYeD)

5. Sounds of Canadian Army artillery fire and smoke fill Queen's Park Crescent as a lone bagpiper plays. A selection of martial music will follow performed by the five piece military band. (HiMY SYeD)

Oumama Kabli, Student Council Social Convenor and grade 11 student at Jarvis Collegiate Institute, delivers the youth pledge: "Our youth today should remember the troops that fought. It's overlooked every single day...every day should be a day of remembrance." (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

6. Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and wife Terri. At Podium: Oumama Kabli, Student Council Social Convenor and grade 11 student at Jarvis Collegiate Institute, delivers the youth pledge: "Our youth today should remember the troops that fought. It's overlooked every single day...every day should be a day of remembrance." (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and wife Teri. At Podium is Retired Major-General Richard Rohmer. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

7. Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and wife Terri. At Podium is Retired Major-General Richard Rohmer. He thanked Canadians for their dedication and reverence to veterans of the First World War to Afghanistan, and of those who never made it home from the conflicts. Notably, General Rohmer had advocated on behalf of the Veterans’ Memorial Advisory Committee to establish the Ontario Veterans Memorial wall, (completed in September 2006) in which he was speaking in front of and where official Provincial Remembrance Day ceremonies took place. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

Toronto firefighters J Popovich and J Robinson stand in front of the Ontario Legislature Building in Queen's Park listening to Premier Dalton McGuinty speak. (HiMY SYeD)

8. Toronto firefighters J Popovich and J Robinson stand in front of the Ontario Legislature Building listening to Premier Dalton McGuinty thank both veterans and members of the public who turned out for Remembrance Day services in Queen's Park. (HiMY SYeD)

The Canadian Flag has been lowered and flies at half staff above the war memorial wall in front of the Ontario Legislature Building in Queen's Park. (HiMY SYeD)

9. The Canadian Flag has been lowered and flies half-mast above the Ontario Veterans Memorial wall in front of the Legislature Building in Queen's Park. (HiMY SYeD)

Toronto Mayor David Miller addressing those gathered for the Remembrance Day commemorations in front of Old City Hall beside the Cenotaph. (Flickr/PJMixer/cc-by-nc-sa)

10. Toronto Mayor David Miller addressing those gathered for the Remembrance Day commemorations in front of Old City Hall beside the Cenotaph: "As I look out across the crowd today, I see the face of Toronto. One of our city’s incredible strengths is that we have people here from every country in the world. Many Torontonians come from war-torn nations and their families have been affected by conflicts that Canada is involved in. Others are here from nations where the conflicts are less known to Canadians though no less deadly. Their first-hand experience of war helps make Remembrance Day more relevant to all of us from school children to currently enlisted troops and well beyond." (Flickr/PJMixer/cc-by-nc-sa)

Thousands of Torontonians fill the Bay Street and Queen Street West intersection in the front of the Cenotaph at Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

11. Thousands of Torontonians fill the Bay Street and Queen Street West intersection in the front of the Cenotaph at Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

Torontonians turned out in greater numbers moreso this year than in the recent past. Both young and old, Veteran and New Canadian alike filled the Bay Street and Queen Street West intersection. In years past the question, "Where are all the people?" was often said aloud as attendance remained in the low hundreds. 2009 however witnessed numbers in the low thousands attend municipal Remembrance Day services at the Cenotaph in front of Old City Hall. When asked, "Why did you attend this year's services?", the answer most given was Canadian Troops currently stationed in Afghanistan has brought home to many Torontonians a desire to be here on this day. (HiMY SYeD)

12. Torontonians turned out in greater numbers moreso this year than in the recent past. Both young and old, Veteran and New Canadian alike filled the Bay Street and Queen Street West intersection. In years past the question, "Where are all the people?" was often said aloud as attendance remained in the low hundreds. 2009 however witnessed numbers in the low thousands attend municipal Remembrance Day services at the Cenotaph in front of Old City Hall. When asked, "Why did you attend this year's services?", the answer most given was Canadian Troops currently stationed in Afghanistan has brought home to many Torontonians a desire to be here on this day. (HiMY SYeD)

Toronto Mayor David Miller with Ontario Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley and wife Ruth await the beginning of the Remembrance Day parade on Bay Street beside Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

13. Toronto Mayor David Miller with Ontario Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley and wife Ruth Ann await the beginning of the Remembrance Day parade on Bay Street beside Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

Members of Toronto Fire Services lead by a firefighter war veteran march up Bay Street beside Old City Hall in Annual Remembrance Day Parade. (HiMY SYeD)

14. Members of Toronto Fire Services lead by a firefighter war veteran march up Bay Street beside Old City Hall in the City of Toronto's annual Remembrance Day parade. (HiMY SYeD)

Marching band of 7th Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery parading north on Bay Street concluding the Municipal Remembrance Day ceremony held at the Cenotaph in front of Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

15. Marching band of 7th Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery parading north on Bay Street concluding the Municipal Remembrance Day ceremony held at the Cenotaph in front of Old City Hall. (HiMY SYeD)

11. A real poppy as a symbol of remembrance. (George Sawision)

16. A real poppy as a symbol of remembrance. (George Sawision)

16. In April 2006, the Harper Government had declared a controversial media ban on covering the return of fallen soldiers from Afghanistan. Consequently, Canadian Flags did not fly at half-mast on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Likewise with the Canadian Flag flying in front of Toronto City Hall in Nathan Phillips Square. George Sawision phoned Mayor David Miller’s office and made a request. On April 25, 2006, Mayor Miller kept his word to George and ordered the Canadian Flag to fly at half-mast to remember those fallen in Afghanistan. Eventually, the media ban was removed followed by the Ontario Government renaming a section of 401 to “The Highway of Heroes” with regular media coverage of the return of fallen soldiers from CFB Trenton to the coroner’s office in downtown Toronto. This image is of the red poppy left by George Sawision following this year’s Remembrance Day ceremony at Old City Hall. He attached  it to the flag pole standing in Nathan Phillips Square in front of Toronto City Hall. Left in honour of the sacrifice of great Canadians, namely corporal Matthew McCully who against all advice returned for a second tour of duty and Matthew Dinning. Both served with pride and sacrifice. Both died in Afghanistan.  (George Sawision)

17. In April 2006, the Harper Government had declared a controversial media ban on covering the return of fallen soldiers from Afghanistan. Consequently, Canadian Flags did not fly at half-mast on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Likewise with the Canadian Flag flying in front of Toronto City Hall in Nathan Phillips Square. George Sawision phoned Mayor David Miller's office and made a request. On April 25, 2006, Mayor Miller kept his word to George and ordered the Canadian Flag to fly at half-mast. Eventually, the media ban was removed followed by the Ontario Government renaming a section of the 401 to "The Highway of Heroes". Media now covers the return of each fallen soldier from CFB Trenton to the Coroner's Office in downtown Toronto. This is the red poppy left by George Sawision following this year's Remembrance Day ceremony at Old City Hall. He attached it to the flag pole standing in Nathan Phillips Square in front of Toronto City Hall. Left in honour of the sacrifice of great Canadians, namely corporal Matthew McCully who against all advice returned for a second tour of duty and Matthew Dinning. Both served with pride and sacrifice. Both died in Afghanistan. (George Sawision)

During WWII, Morris was as an electrician servicing vehicles for the Canadian Army in Europe (incl. England, France and Italy). When he returned home after the War, he returned to school and got a degree in electrical engineering. Morris is an 88 year old veteran, a true gentleman and friendly fellow. (Flickr/PJMixer/cc-by-nc-sa)

18. During WWII, Morris was as an electrician servicing vehicles for the Canadian Army in Europe (incl. England, France and Italy). When he returned home after the War, he resumed his education earning a degree in electrical engineering. Morris is an 88 year old veteran, a true gentleman and friendly fellow. November 10, 2009. (Flickr/PJMixer/cc-by-nc-sa)

United States Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant in dress blues wearing the Purple Heart and other medals in Queen's Park attending Provincial Remembrance Day services. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

19. United States Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant wearing a red poppy attached with a Canadian flag friendship pin. In full dress blues, Gunney wears the Purple Heart alongside numerous service medals while attending Provincial Remembrance Day services in Queen's Park. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

13. A Canadian serviceman stands, contrasting photographic images laser-etched into the granite wall. The Ontario Veterans Memorial is a 30 metre (100-foot-long) granite wall located on the front south lawn of Queen's Park. Members of the public stand on the north side of the Memorial wall listening to dignitaries speaking below. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

20. A serviceman stands contrasting the photographic images laser-etched into the granite wall. The Ontario Veterans Memorial is a 30 metre (100-foot-long) granite wall located on the front South Lawn of Queen's Park. Members of the public stand above on the north side of the Memorial wall to listen to dignitaries speaking below. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

14. Cadets with poppy laden wreath pose for a group photograph in front of the Ontario Veterans Memorial wall on the south lawn of the Queen's Park. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

21. Cadets with poppy laden wreath pose for a group photograph in front of the Ontario Veterans Memorial wall on the south lawn of Queen's Park. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

15. Podium Message, "November 11. A Day We Remember." in front of the Ontario Veterans Memorial on the South Lawn of Queen's Park. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

22. Podium Message, "November 11 A Day We Remember." in front of the Ontario Veterans Memorial on the South Lawn of Queen's Park. (Flickr/Tsar Kasim/cc-by-sa)

2009 marked the 91st Remembrance Day Ceremony held in front of the Cenotaph outside of today's Old City Hall. Torontonians have made a tradition of removing their red poppies after each November 11, and placing them on the small front lawn in front of the Cenotaph. Seen here are those red poppies with the official City of Toronto Wreath in the background on November 13, 2009. (HiMY SYeD)

23. This year is Toronto's 175th anniversary and for the past ninety-one of those years, Armistice and Remembrance Day Ceremonies have been held in front of the Cenotaph outside of today's Old City Hall. Torontonians have made a tradition of removing their red poppies after each November 11, and placing them on the small front lawn facing the Cenotaph. Seen here are this year's red poppies. The official City of Toronto Wreath is in the background. November 13, 2009. (HiMY SYeD)

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